a Pu-erh.sk Yi Bang Spring 2011 session soundtracked by John Lee Hooker

This is the second of two sheng pu samples from Yi Bang in as many months, this one from pu-erh.sk. This a spring plucking. (from the site: PU-ERH.sk is a website that will try to offer mostly selected “gu shu” Pu-erh’s from the 10 famous tea mountains of Yun-Nan province.)

I opted to use the full 10g sample provided in the prepped 150ml gaiwan. (Where in years past I had used a smaller quantity of leaf to water ratio, I have steadily increased this quantity to suit the increasing demands of my palate.)

The body of the broth was substantially thick. The color a clear yellow-gold –should the photos read darker I apologize as we have had about 3 hours of sunlight over the past six days.

The liquor delivered a well-tempered ku which moved in waves across the hard and soft palates, and streaked the length of the tongue into the deep of the throat. The ku se persisted across the dominant length of the session, continually provoking my want to take another steeping as it fluctuated in its strength.

A faint cooling note was present, stimulating the sinus cavity.

The throat feeling alternated between the sensations of catching half way into my throat, to slowly and deliberately moving down its full length. This later experience is where I found myself reminded of the thickness of gulab jamun syrup in its movement.

The leaves continued producing broths that increasingly saturated the mouth with a heavy sweetness by the later quarter, extending the session well beyond my anticipation.

This tea, for me, acted as a mild sedative. While my mind remained clear and focused on the experience, my body wholly relaxed. Even the tightness in my lower back which had been present since I awoke eased. A tingling sensation also developed throughout the session in my torso and upper arms. My ears even prickled for a few deep breaths.

What remains most impressive about this tea is how long the floral and honey sweetness has lingered since I walked away from the kettle and gaiwan. It has now been an hour, and it still persists. This, I can appreciate.

steeping listening:John Lee Hooker

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4 thoughts on “a Pu-erh.sk Yi Bang Spring 2011 session soundtracked by John Lee Hooker

  1. I love the musical choice. John Lee Hooker would work well.

    As far as the tea goes, I have to say that I loved the first infusions, but was a touch disappointed later on, when it seemed to get a little rough and green. It’s good to read that you had an altogether better experience.

    Toodlepip,

    Hobbes

    • Ha. Thanks. The John Lee Hooker really seemed to help make the most out of the session.

      Interesting about the difference in your experience… it really did gently unwind for me during the session which I enjoyed. I had assumed the leaves would have been drained at the latter point, and then they just returned this heavy honey sweetness, which actually surprised me.

      Will you be posting about your personal experiences soon? I would love to read them.

      BTW, your review of the 2011 Yunzhiyuan “Autumn Banpo Laozhai” has really peaked my curiosity for a sample. Thanks for that!

      Best,

      Eric

  2. Eric, nice review and a brave dose of tea leaves, I used to make tea from such amount in the past but later my stomach started to complain :-). I wanted to comment on the sensation you described. Some teas give a very calming and relaxing sensation others stir up the mind and give a rise for restlessness. Ive been wondering for some time what could cause this. Either the tea plant age, condition, over-plucking and also pesticide and other growth accelerators used.

    • I think its all the years of fermented chilis coupled with high percentage cacao. My partner has often said how lucky I am to have a stomach made of teflon. I knock on wood daily that it remains that way.

      I seem to remember reading that L-Theanine is the culprit for the meditative experience found in tea (focused mind/relaxed body). I haven’t dug too much into the chemical compounds, etc. related to tea. I did so with cacao, and in the end it sapped some of the magic from it for me. I do feel that some of the effect is spurred on by what your body desires, and processes the elements of the tea accordingly. I know that sounds much less scientific, and is of course total conjecture. 🙂

      From my understanding from reading others notes, chemically sprayed trees tend to produce broths that leave an unpleasant taste in the mouth, and/or cloud the mind by comparison to producing clarity and focus. I would be interested to know if anyone has had an experience related to chemically treated tea trees.

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